Beautiful, clear water

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Thankfully I’ve managed to find a way to find one more frustrating aspect of v r 3 kind of interesting again. With one of the more expensive waters I’m using I’ve struggled mightily to get the configuration of the water “right” – notably to scale it down to my little plinth-amount rather than a lake/sea/river’s worth of water. The water looks great at a large scale in the demo provided with the water itself, but when I scale it down and put it in my plinth it looks terrible.

Or does it?

See, the reason I’ve been frustrated and fighting with this particular water is that you kind of can’t quite see it when it’s in the plinth. You can kind of make out some rippling, and if you move around you can see the light reflecting off its surface now and again, but there isn’t that satisfying kind of blue “here is some water” effect that most of the other waters provide when I put them in the plinth.

Except that water isn’t actually blue, right?

Water is, in its pure form, clear/transparent/see-through. So when I put this water in the white, featureless plinth and I can’t see it, there’s a sense in which it’s behaving more like water than the other water’s I’ve been working with. If you really got one of these plinths (in physical reality) and poured water into it, and looked down into the water, you wouldn’t see much of anything either. Unless it was rippling and caught the light, say.

So in fact the problem with this new water illustrates yet another fun tension in this project, or rather a question. Or maybe two questions?

To what extent is it my job to make any given water look good in the plinth? A lot of the waters, as I’ve detailed in past posts, don’t necessarily play nice with being scaled down, for example. I’ve been working on things like rescaling textures and normal maps and so on to have the water appear more like water, but another way to approach this would be a more hardline attitude of saying “whatever the water looks like when scaled and placed in the plinth is what it looks like”. That would be easier, too, but doesn’t sit right. My compromise has been to roughly try to convince the water to look like it does when it’s big, just contained in a smaller space, which has almost always required me to tweak various parameters (ineptly and with many curse words thrown about).

What does it even mean for water to look good? This is perhaps a deeper (ha ha) question? As above, I’ve tended to answer it by saying that the water looks good (or ‘correct’ perhaps) when it approximates what the creator of the water made it look like in their demo or prefabricated version of the water. However, as in my discussion of the clear water further above, sometimes you can’t necessarily do that because the water itself is closer to a physical simulation of water. If the water is designed to essentially be clear and thus to only draw colour from the container, say, then if you put it in a plinth and it’s basically invisible then it’s “good” in the sense of looking like water would really look in a plinth. But it’s also not good in the sense of how we kind of want water in a videogame to look in a plinth. We want it to look “watery”, and without really thinking it through that means it should probably be bluish and highly visible. This also starts to link up to larger ideas about “good looking water” as a real technical benchmark for videogames more generally, I guess. And again, I’d venture that it’s not necessarily the case that the most perfectly simulated water would be considered the best, but rather the water that somehow feels the most real. Which is different.

The upshot of all this is that I’m almost at peace now, I think, with letting this water I’ve been fighting with just be transparent and that’s that. It’s water, that’s just what it does, right?

Somewhat deliciously the water in this case is called… Realistic Water. The clue’s in the name. Ha ha. Bye.

6 March 2017
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