Water-borne disasters

Screen Shot 2017-03-09 at 12.54.05

I wrote briefly about some experiences with water gone wrong in v r 3 a little while back, but since I’ve been rebuilding the game from scratch to eliminate some lighting problems, I’ve run into a couple of my old weird friends again, like “super sharp sticky-uppy water” (above) and so on.

The above image is what happens if I literally just take a specific water I bought and resize it to fit it into my plinth. In a sense, then, this is “just what the water looks like” when you apply that simple transformation to it. And it’s a transformation I don’t think is terribly unreasonable – I need the water to exist in a smaller area, so I resize it. The fact that the water ends up looking like this is, I guess, most of all a result of the sometimes extreme parameterisation of the various waters I’m installing in the gallery. There are generally quite a large number of factors to be controlled for any given water, and they tend to rely on one another for an overall coherence of appearance. Thus, if you resize the water above, you also need to make sure that you change other aspects like the frequency and amplitude of its waves so that they make sense in the new context.

On the other hand, the water above looks pretty amazing, I’m not going to lie. And there have been quite a few instances of “broken” water that has looked pretty spectacular. Some water, for instance, completely ignores its scaling and just renders to the horizon anyway, leading to the entire gallery being half submerged. Some water has little undulating pieces of itself sticking through the sides of the plinths.

So there’s certainly a beauty to these distortions of shaders and scripts. As I’ve heard a few times, there’s probably another gallery show just in that idea itself. There’s a challenge there I think, though, in terms of what the “rules” for such a show would be. I don’t think it’s necessarily fair to just work out a way fuck up a shader or other Unity asset so it looks ridiculous and then display that. It’s true that that appearance would be “within its parameters”, but it feels a little in bad faith perhaps? (As I write this I’m not so sure.) Instead I guess I’d want some sort of “reasonable” transformation (like the plinth scaling) that turns out to create strange effects. But of course lots of the problems I have with the scaling in v r 3 don’t end up being visually interesting like the jagged water – most of the time you just end up with a completely smooth plane or something along those lines, so that kind of wouldn’t work anyway.

In the end I always want some sort of underlying formal reason for things being the way they are, I suppose. I feel like that gives a player a framework for understanding what they’re seeing, rather than just what they’re seeing being kind of the end of it, like “look how crazy this is! ha ha!” I think in the past I’ve called this something like the “ground truth” of a project, I don’t know what a good name is, but it’s certainly a vital quality. Most importantly, I think, it really helps me make decisions and move forwards – you know whether a particular idea/technical process/visual meets the criteria of your core guiding framework. So for v r 3 I know that the underlying concept is that I’m wanting to provide a context for thinking about water as a technical/aesthetic object in the context of videogames. Everything I’m doing, from the positioning of the sun in the sky, to the shape of the plinth, to the parameterisations of the waters themselves is informed by the objective.

Without something so strict, I think I’d just constantly get lost or feel like I’m kind of deceiving the player – pretending there’s coherence and meaning where there isn’t any. Thus to do a project where I’m showing “messed up” waters, it’d need some guiding idea like “water when you scale it down” or “water with each parameter set to a maximum value” or something, and even then, with that “or something”, you can tell that I’m not yet a  believer in that version of the project. Something more like “messed up visions of water I encountered while making a different project about water” might be acceptable too, I guess, but it’s less conceptually interesting to me.

Etc. etc. etc. Sorry.

10 March 2017
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